Tag: Paul Rudd

MOVIE REVIEW | Captain America: Civil War (2016)

In a nutshell, Bored & Dangerous says: “I really wouldn’t consider myself a Marvel or comic book fanboy, but as I read my own gushing praise and geeky enthusiasm for this movie, I might have to rethink that.”

 Captain 1.jpg
“This job… We try to save as many people as we can. Sometimes that doesn’t mean everybody.  But if we can’t find a way to live with that, next time… Maybe nobody gets saved.”

Marvel Studios really has cracked the code.  I read comic books for a few years as a teenager, but I’m in no way an authority of devotee.  To me, the already massive, ever expanding Marvel cinematic universe is filled with movies that are all basically the same.  The names of the characters might change, and the objects of desire they’re trying to keep from their interchangeable villains might be different, but strip away the surface level stuff, and there’s really no difference between a movie about The Avengers, compared to one about The Guardians of the Galaxy, or the latest offering starring Thor.  Yet for all of that, I can’t help loving the ride every single time I take it.  Which just happened once again, with Captain America: Civil War.

After the events of The Avengers: Age of Ultron saw an entire city ripped from the earth, raised to the sky and thousands killed, the US government, represented by Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross (William Hurt), decides it’s time for enhanced humans like the Avengers to come under the control of the United Nations.  The two alpha Avengers are split on this, with Iron Man / Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr), in favor, and Captain America / Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) firmly against. (more…)

MOVIE REVIEW | ***CLOSING DOWN WEEK*** The Ten (2007)

In a nutshell, Bored & Dangerous says: “There’s something so intricately planned and meticulously honed underneath that joke delivery surface, that those gags actually have something to say.”

Ten 1
“Gretchen… Hey, I was in the neighborhood. I thought I’d come by and take a shit.”

Recently, in my neighbourhood, I saw something that’s all too common these days.  A video shop that was closing down.  They had a big sign out the front, “4 movies for $10”.  I looked in my wallet, saw $30 and decided I wasn’t leaving that shop until I found 12 movies I thought were worth having on my DVD shelf.  Some were movies I’d seen before.  Some were movies I had a vague idea about and thought would be worth the $2.50 gamble.  Some were oddities I’d never even heard of, but they looked interesting enough.  So, thank you, Network Video Brunswick West.  I never rented anything from you or even had a membership, but I did find some cool, interesting and mysterious things on your almost empty shelves.


Making smart, dumb comedies is an underappreciated art form.  For every awesomely clever, but silly movie, like Airplane or Blazing Saddles, you get dozens of just plain dumb, dumb comedies, like anything with “Movie” in its title.  On TV, Tina Fey is a master of smart dumbness.  And in movies, I think the best director out there right now might be David Wain.  He had a surprise hit with Role Models, then an unfair flop with Wanderlust.  And in 2014, he made one of the best spoof movies since the afore mentioned Airplane, with They Came Together.  But before all that, he was still figuring out how to best present his version of smart, dumbness, with The Ten. (more…)

***2015 RECAP*** MOVIE REVIEW | Ant-Man (2015)

ant man movie 2015

“Sorry I’m late, I was saving the world. You know how it is.”

As the Marvel movie juggernaut rolls on, seemingly unstoppable, they have to dig deeper into their comic book roster of characters top populate this ever expanding world.  With mega popular characters like the X-Men and Fantastic Four tied up with other studios, last year Marvel took a gamble on the little known Guardians of the Galaxy, and it paid off big.  I was skeptical of that movie, then found it amazing fun.  But even with that hindsight, and even with the always delightful Paul Rudd in the lead, I found it hard to look past the corny premise in the lead up to Ant-Man.


Scott Lang (Rudd) is released after a few years in jail for some Robin Hood style embezzling from big business to pay back exploited employees.  With a young daughter as his inspiration, Scott is determined to stay on the straight and narrow and find straight work.  But when his record as a felon makes that impossible, he takes one last job as a cat burglar so he can make the cash he needs to gain visitation rights with his kid.  He robs the house of Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and finds a mysterious suit locked away in a heavy duty safe.  When curiosity gets the better of him, he tries the suit on and discovers it gives him the power to shrink to the size of an ant. (more…)

MOVIE REVIEW | Ant-Man (2015)

ant man movie 2015

“Sorry I’m late, I was saving the world. You know how it is.”

As the Marvel movie juggernaut rolls on, seemingly unstoppable, they have to dig deeper into their comic book roster of characters top populate this ever expanding world.  With mega popular characters like the X-Men and Fantastic Four tied up with other studios, last year Marvel took a gamble on the little known Guardians of the Galaxy, and it paid off big.  I was skeptical of that movie, then found it amazing fun.  But even with that hindsight, and even with the always delightful Paul Rudd in the lead, I found it hard to look past the corny premise in the lead up to Ant-Man.


Scott Lang (Rudd) is released after a few years in jail for some Robin Hood style embezzling from big business to pay back exploited employees.  With a young daughter as his inspiration, Scott is determined to stay on the straight and narrow and find straight work.  But when his record as a felon makes that impossible, he takes one last job as a cat burglar so he can make the cash he needs to gain visitation rights with his kid.  He robs the house of Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and finds a mysterious suit locked away in a heavy duty safe.  When curiosity gets the better of him, he tries the suit on and discovers it gives him the power to shrink to the size of an ant. (more…)

***2014 RECAP*** MOVIE REVIEW | They Came Together (2014)

They Came
Molly: “Can I ask you a question; how do you sleep at night?” Joel: “I usually jerk off and then sleep pretty soundly”.

Parody or spoof movies are possibly the worst genre of movie being churned out today, but it’s not the genre’s fault. In fact, before the Wayans Brothers ruined it for everyone, and before the endless dribble of “Not Another…” movies managed to go even lower, the parody movie was actually a pretty sure thing for some solid laughs.


The Naked Gun movies perfectly spoofed cop shows and made for some of the funniest comedies of late 80s and early 90s. In 1980, Airplane! was such a successful and hilarious take on the 70s disaster movie, it’s more famous and enduring today than the genre it spoofed. And it’s the spirit of Airplane and The Naked Gun that makes They Came Together the best parody, spoof, joke machine movie in a long, long time. (more…)

MOVIE REVIEW | Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (2013)

Anchorman-2-Poster-575x301

“Who the hell is Julius Caesar? You know I don’t follow the NBA!”

I don’t like Anchorman: The legend of Ron Burgundy. Yeah, that’s right, I don’t like Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy. I don’t just not like it, I also have no idea how it became the favourite it is. Usually, even if I don’t like an immensely popular movie, I can at least see why others do. But the original Anchorman has no real redeeming qualities that make up for its lazy, shitty jokes. I’m not anti Will Ferrell / Adam McKay. I like Talladega Nights, I love Step Brothers. I even thought The Other Guys was kind of interesting.


I watched the first Anchorman a decade ago when it first came out and its initial buzz was unavoidable. Its cast was great (the first sign of the massive comedy career Paul Rudd would go on to build), the story setup showed plenty of potential, and Ferrell is always going to bring more laughs than your average comedic lead. Only, it rarely made me laugh, and the potential fuelled premise quickly turned into a well and truly flogged dead horse. (more…)

MOVIE REVIEW | They Came Together (2014)

They Came
Molly: “Can I ask you a question; how do you sleep at night?” Joel: “I usually jerk off and then sleep pretty soundly”.

Parody or spoof movies are possibly the worst genre of movie being churned out today, but it’s not the genre’s fault. In fact, before the Wayans Brothers ruined it for everyone, and before the endless dribble of “Not Another…” movies managed to go even lower, the parody movie was actually a pretty sure thing for some solid laughs.


The Naked Gun movies perfectly spoofed cop shows and made for some of the funniest comedies of late 80s and early 90s. In 1980, Airplane! was such a successful and hilarious take on the 70s disaster movie, it’s more famous and enduring today than the genre it spoofed. And it’s the spirit of Airplane and The Naked Gun that makes They Came Together the best parody, spoof, joke machine movie in a long, long time. (more…)

***2013 RECAP*** MOVIE REVIEW | Prince Avalanche

prince-avalanche-poster

David Gordon Green emerged in 2000 directing George Washington.  It was followed by All the Real Girls and Undertow, making him the king of low budget, low key indie movies that movie snobs could brag about liking.  Then he made Pineapple Express (funny), Your Highness (never saw, looked terrible) and The Sitter (never saw it, looked even worse).  Paul Rudd emerged as the dreamy step brother in Clueless, then disappeared before exploding back into the mainstream as one of Judd Apatow’s most reliable and hilarious weapons.  Emile Hirsch was the moody kid in Lords of Dogtown, the moody (and totally unlikeable) lead in Into the Wild, then crapped the bed with Speed Racer.  The reason I go into all of this is because I think their eclectic history plays a big part in everything I liked about Prince Avalanche.  And I liked a lot of things about Prince Avalanche.


Rudd and Hirsch are Alvin and Lance respectively, road crew workers, restoring a remote stretch of road on the middle of nowhere after a massive wild fire.  Rudd is the straight laced, hard worker.  Hirsch is the aimless little brother of Rudd’s girlfriend, who obviously only got his job through that connection.  The vast majority of Prince Avalanche is just these two dudes, going through the mundane, repetitive motions of their job.  Somehow though, Green makes sure painting road lines, hammering in safety posts and laying out witches hats is always strangely mesmerising, never boring.

A couple of other characters float in and out, but they’re almost like figments of Rudd and Hirsch’s imaginations.  With their hypnotic monologues and questions about life, they could almost be straight out Richard Linklater’s Slacker or Waking Life.

While Rudd is the uptight one and Hirsch is the perpetual screw up, their dynamic isn’t as predictable and by the numbers as those descriptions sound.  Rudd is uptight, but he’s not above stopping down for an on the job beer in the middle of the day when one is on offer.  Hirsch is a directionless slacker, but you see him really trying to do his job well and learn from Rudd from the get go.  There’s no clichéd moment when they both realise they can learn a lot form the other.  It seems like a real, lived in relationship between the two.

This really is a great movie and a great sign for all three of the main players.  I don’t think anyone ever doubted Rudd’s acting ability, but it’s still cool to see something so different and toned down from his usual.  Emile Hirsch seems to be pretty picky about what he does (Speed Racer aside), and this is the first time I’ve seen him take on a role bordering on broad and comedic, and he nails it.

But the real positive is the return of David Gordon Green to this small, character based, talk heavy style of film making.  Pineapple Express was funny enough and shows he knows how to execute big comedy and use a bigger budget, but there are plenty of people out there making those sorts of movies.  There aren’t as many who know how to make something like Prince Avalanche.  Small, quiet and introspective, but never pretentious, arduous or boring.

Prince Avalanche
Directed By – David Gordon Green
Written By – David Gordon Green

MOVIE REVIEW | Prince Avalanche (2013)

prince-avalanche-poster

David Gordon Green emerged in 2000 directing George Washington.  It was followed by All the Real Girls and Undertow, making him the king of low budget, low key indie movies that movie snobs could brag about liking.  Then he made Pineapple Express (funny), Your Highness (never saw, looked terrible) and The Sitter (never saw it, looked even worse).  Paul Rudd emerged as the dreamy step brother in Clueless, then disappeared before exploding back into the mainstream as one of Judd Apatow’s most reliable and hilarious weapons.  Emile Hirsch was the moody kid in Lords of Dogtown, the moody (and totally unlikeable) lead in Into the Wild, then crapped the bed with Speed Racer.  The reason I go into all of this is because I think their eclectic history plays a big part in everything I liked about Prince Avalanche.  And I liked a lot of things about Prince Avalanche.


Rudd and Hirsch are Alvin and Lance respectively, road crew workers, restoring a remote stretch of road on the middle of nowhere after a massive wild fire.  Rudd is the straight laced, hard worker.  Hirsch is the aimless little brother of Rudd’s girlfriend, who obviously only got his job through that connection.  The vast majority of Prince Avalanche is just these two dudes, going through the mundane, repetitive motions of their job.  Somehow though, Green makes sure painting road lines, hammering in safety posts and laying out witches hats is always strangely mesmerising, never boring.

A couple of other characters float in and out, but they’re almost like figments of Rudd and Hirsch’s imaginations.  With their hypnotic monologues and questions about life, they could almost be straight out Richard Linklater’s Slacker or Waking Life.

While Rudd is the uptight one and Hirsch is the perpetual screw up, their dynamic isn’t as predictable and by the numbers as those descriptions sound.  Rudd is uptight, but he’s not above stopping down for an on the job beer in the middle of the day when one is on offer.  Hirsch is a directionless slacker, but you see him really trying to do his job well and learn from Rudd from the get go.  There’s no clichéd moment when they both realise they can learn a lot form the other.  It seems like a real, lived in relationship between the two.

This really is a great movie and a great sign for all three of the main players.  I don’t think anyone ever doubted Rudd’s acting ability, but it’s still cool to see something so different and toned down from his usual.  Emile Hirsch seems to be pretty picky about what he does (Speed Racer aside), and this is the first time I’ve seen him take on a role bordering on broad and comedic, and he nails it.

But the real positive is the return of David Gordon Green to this small, character based, talk heavy style of film making.  Pineapple Express was funny enough and shows he knows how to execute big comedy and use a bigger budget, but there are plenty of people out there making those sorts of movies.  There aren’t as many who know how to make something like Prince Avalanche.  Small, quiet and introspective, but never pretentious, arduous or boring.

Prince Avalanche
Directed By – David Gordon Green
Written By – David Gordon Green