Tag: nashville

MUSIC REVIEW | Jerry Reed – Nashville Underground (1968)

In a nutshell, Bored & Dangerous says: “These old standards are hindered by a little too much faux earnestness and polish.”

Jerry 1
When I was a kid, Jerry Reed was the bloke who played The Snowman, the big rig driving sidekick to Burt Reynolds’ titular Bandit in The Smokey and the Bandit movies.  When I was teenager, I was impressed to discover that he didn’t only act on those movies, he also performed their awesome theme song, East Bound and Down.  Then, a few years ago, I realised how much deeper than that one song his musical career went.  It turns out, Jerry Reed is a bona fide country music legend and guitar virtuoso.  Talents that mostly go to waste on Nashville Underground.

Pretty far from the boot kickin’ country I was expecting, Remembering opens proceedings with a samba swing ballad.  It’s also Reed singing with a much smoother, more tender tone than I have ever heard in my limited experience with his music.  I associate his voice with movie saloons and road houses, not elevators. (more…)

***2015 RECAP*** MUSIC REVIEW | Sturgill Simpson – High Top Mountain (2015)

Sturgill
There’s an undeniable sincerity and feel of experience that comes with a southern accent in music.  Lyrics that could sound corny, or overly written, or just plane awkward, can often come off as believable, heartfelt and totally natural when there’s some twang to them.  And twang is what you get with Sturgill Simpson.  But as High Top Mountain proves, there’s a whole lot more to his music than twang.


From the first plucked guitar notes and drawled lyrics, Sturgill Simpson and Life Ain’t Fare and the World is Mean make sure you know exactly what you’re in for.  This is some old school country, in the outlaw vein of Waylon Jennings.  “You can always find me in smoking bars, standing on a dim lit stage”, doesn’t just sound like a matter of fact, it sounds like a mission statement. (more…)

MUSIC REVIEW | Sturgill Simpson – High Top Mountain (2015)

Sturgill
There’s an undeniable sincerity and feel of experience that comes with a southern accent in music.  Lyrics that could sound corny, or overly written, or just plane awkward, can often come off as believable, heartfelt and totally natural when there’s some twang to them.  And twang is what you get with Sturgill Simpson.  But as High Top Mountain proves, there’s a whole lot more to his music than twang.


From the first plucked guitar notes and drawled lyrics, Sturgill Simpson and Life Ain’t Fare and the World is Mean make sure you know exactly what you’re in for.  This is some old school country, in the outlaw vein of Waylon Jennings.  “You can always find me in smoking bars, standing on a dim lit stage”, doesn’t just sound like a matter of fact, it sounds like a mission statement. (more…)

MUSIC REVIEW | Dolly Parton – Coat of Many Colors (1971)

Dolly
‘Punchline’ is a strong word.  But when I was growing up, Dolly Parton was long past her prime as a respected country super star.  She was the chick with massive cans, the theme park named after herself and the wardrobe of nothing less than pure excess.  In my house, she was also Burt Reynolds‘ co-star in The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, a movie that got watched more often than I could ever understand with hindsight.


In the last decade or so, she’s moved passed those 80s and 90s years of pastiche and self parody, and moved into the glory years of elder statesmanship.  But before all of that, there were those years and years of being a respected country super star.  I’m trying to see what all the fuss was out back then, with Coat of Many Colors. (more…)

MUSIC REVIEW | Chris Shiflett and the Dead Peasants – All Hat and No Cattle (2013)

chris_shiflett_and_the_dead_peasants_all_hat_and_no_cattle

From time with punk rock stayers No Use for a Name, to sold out arenas all over the world with Foo Fighters, to punk super group / cover band Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, Chris Shiflett is obviously a man passionate about his music, who will take any outlet on offer.  And when you’re in a band as big as Foo Fighters, those outlets are probably a little more numerous than for your average journeyman guitarist.  But make no mistake, Chris Shiflett and the Dead Peasants is no vanity project.


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