Tag: movie

MOVIE REVIEW | Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986)

In a nutshell, Bored & Dangerous says: “It’s brutal in its portrayal of Henry’s killings, but I never felt like I was watching a slasher movie or horror.”

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“She was a whore. My mama was a whore. But I don’t fault her for that. It ain’t what she done, but how she done it.”

Here is one of those movies where all I knew about it was the notoriety of its existence, and nothing about the actual story being told.  It faced backlash from censors, it struggled to find distribution and it was banned in some countries.  But for all of that resistance, 30 years after its release, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer is a movie that found an audience then, and keeps getting talked about today.


A montage of shots shows several women, all brutally killed in different ways.  Cut to Henry (Michael Rooker) an intense, and intensely unsettling dude.  He’s the kind of guy whose everydayness lets him hide in plain sight, but if you do pay attention, he doesn’t have to do anything specific to appear unsettling, he just is.  Henry lives in Chicago with Otis (Tom Towles), an old prison buddy.  And soon, Henry also lives with Becky (Tracy Arnold), Otis’ sister who has quit her job as a stripper and left a young son behind as she moves to Chicago hoping to find a better job to build a better life for her and her left behind son. (more…)

MOVIE REVIEW | In America (2002)

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Jim Sheridan has made some important movies.  Things like My Left Foot and In the Name of the Father.  Movies that tackle big issues, serious themes and get lots of attention at Oscar time.  He also made the movie starring 50 Cent, which just seems too bonkers for me to ever watch.  I don’t think the reality of a white haired old Irishman directing a flash in the pan gangster rapper could ever live up to the wacky weirdness thinking about that combo conjures up.  And amongst that filmography, you get something small, something personal, something really affecting, like In America.


Semi autobiographical, and co-written with his daughters, In America parallels Sheridan’s own decision to movie to New York with his wife and young daughters in the early 80s.  Paddy Considine is the Sheridan facsimile, playing Johnny Sullivan, husband, father and struggling actor.  Samantha Morton is his wife Sarah, and real life sisters Sarah and Emma Bolger play daughters Christy and Ariel.

Broke on arrival, they move into a run down building of junkies, hookers and general low lifes.  Initially their high spirits get them through, but they’re soon worn down.  They meet their intimidating neighbour Mateo, played by Djimon Houbnsou who eventually becomes the family’s closest friend.  Which makes it a real kick in the guys when you find out he has a bit of the of the old AIDS.  Sarah falls pregnant which only highlights their money troubles and the pain Johnny is still feeling over the recent death of their young son, Frankie.

Amongst all the bad luck, and general crapping on the Sullivan family by the universe, In America is ultimately a really optimistic and happy movie.  It’s all about unfaltering familial love and support, sticking together through the rough times and ultimately finding happiness.  That probably sounds pretty schmaltzy, and at times In America is definitely that, but somehow Sheridan makes it work.

There’s nothing subtle about this movie.  It wears its message very openly on its sleeve.  Luckily, Considine is an amazing actor and really sells it.  Morton did a job so good she got nominated for an Oscar, and it’s impossible not to like the two young girls. Hounsou is lumped with a bit of a clichéd character, the wise and spiritual black dude with an exotic accent, but he does the best with it.

If you want a movie that heaps on the sadness and despair just so it can hit you over the head with an ultra happy ending, In America ticks all the boxes.  And I don’t mean that to sound so dismissive.  Even the oldest and most worn out clichés are still entertaining when executed well.

In America
Directed By – Jim Sheridan
Written By – Jim Sheridan, Naomi Sheridan, Kristen Sherida

MOVIE REVIEW | We’re the Millers (2013)

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We’re the Millers kind of snuck up out of nowhere.  I’d never heard a single thing about it until I saw the trailer one day before another movie.  And that trailer made me laugh out loud more than once.  Then it was out, no one took any notice and it disappeared (although it did make pretty good money).  Well, I finally got around to it and I know why seemingly no one took any notice of We’re the Millers.


The movie opens with David Clark (Jason Sudeikis) leading the carefree life of a small time drug dealer in Denver.  He runs into an old friend who is now a hen pecked husband and father.  When the friend talks about how lucky Sudeikis is to not be tied down to anyone and have no responsibilities, the lonely look on Sudeikis’ face lets you know how by the numbers We’re the Millers will be for the next hour and half.

Arriving home, he runs into his stripper neighbour Rose (Jennifer Aniston), his awkward teenage neighbour Kenny (Will Poulter) and homeless young runaway Casey (Emma Roberts).  Sudeikis is soon in the office of his wholesaler, played by Ed Helms, who forces him to go to Mexico to pick up a shipment.  Sudeikis decides the best cover to make it back over the border into America is that of an all American family road tripping it in an RV.  So he enlists the neighbours who luckily suit the roles of wife and kids perfectly, and much hilarity ensues.  Only, it doesn’t.  If you’ve seen the trailer, you’ve seen all the hilarity to be ensued.

There are a few sequences with Nick Offerman and Kathryn Hahn as a couple on their own RV trip with their daughter that leads to some kind of funny moments.  But again, if you’ve seen the trailer, you’ve seen most of them.

The cast isn’t to blame for the mediocrity.  I think Jennifer Aniston is generally underrated, especially as a comedic actor.  Her flops are more about her choice of movies than the job she does in them.  Poulter does a great job as the so-awkward-it’s-painful ‘son’, and Roberts is pretty fun as the ‘daughter’.  I guess Sudeikis is fine in the main role, but he’s such an ordinary everyman, he never really makes an impact.  He’s just there so all this stuff can happen around him.

We’re the Millers even resorts to bloopers in the end credits in an attempt to mine a few more laughs.  Now this is a devise that I actually think there should be more of.  In fact, I don’t know why every comedy doesn’t do it, because I always love them.  At least, I used to always love them and I used to not know why every comedy doesn’t do it.  Now I know.

There’s nothing terrible about We’re the Millers.  There’s nothing great about it either.  There’s just not much of anything to We’re the Millers and that’s the real problem.  Not many jokes, not many conceits you haven’t seen before and absolutely nothing happens that you won’t see coming a mile away.

We’re the Millers
Directed By – Rawson Marshall Thurber
Written By – Bob Fisher, Steve Faber, Sean Anders, John Morris

MOVIE REVIEW | Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013)

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What does a title say about a movie?  I’ve read a few reviews for this one, and even the people who like the movie have felt the need to crap on the title.  I’m the opposite.  The ambiguity, grammatical incorrectness and general awkwardness of the title had made me really intrigued.  Unfortunately, the movie Ain’t Them Bodies Saints isn’t nearly as interesting or complex as the title Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.


In Texas, Bob (Casey Affleck) follows his wife Ruth (Roonie Marar) through a field.  She’s pissed off about something and returning to her mother’s house.  Until she tells him she’s pregnant, then she’s not pissed off anymore and they lovingly embrace.  Cut to months later and Bob is affectionately singing into Ruth’s pregnant stomach as they wait in a car for something.

That something turns out to be a robbery which leads to them taking refuge in an abandoned shack before a shootout with the cops that sees their accomplice dead and Bob taking the wrap for Ruth shooting and injuring a cop (Ben Foster).  Now he’s off to the big house and she’s off to give birth.

Six or seven years later, the cop Ruth shot has a crush on her, the kid is an adorable moppet and Bob breaks out of prison to find the spoils of his crimes and run away with his wife and daughter.  Once on the outside, we meet an old friend of Bob’s, an old mentor to Bob and father figure to Ruth, and some bounty hunters trying to cash in on Bob’s escape.  There’s no point in me trying to describe or differentiate any of them any more than that, because the movie never bothers with it either.

I’m not sure which, if any, characters in Ain’t Them Bodies Saints I was supposed to like.  Every line of dialogue given to Casey Affleck is talking about how much he loves his wife and daughter and how he’ll do anything to help them, but I don’t care how many artfully crafted monologues he gets, I can’t believe it if I never see any evidence of it.  That’s sort of the problem with this movie as a whole.  Everyone is constantly talking about their feelings, their motivations, their actions, but no one ever really demonstrates any of them.  It’s a movie…  Show, don’t tell.

When every single character is tortured, contemplative and dangerous, they all just combine into a big sludge of similarities that meant I could never differentiate anyone’s motives or actions enough to care about anyone.  They’re all basically the same character, just approaching the story from slightly different perspectives.  Director and writer David Lowery could have mixed and matched any of these actors with any of the speaking roles, and none of the performances would have needed to change at all.

What does a title say about a movie?  With Ain’t Them Bodies Saints I guess it kind of proves all the bad things a title like this might suggest.  The performances are all strong, I just wish they weren’t all the same.  It’s talky and filled with embarrassingly self aware monologues, to the point of the writer’s over indulgence.  It assumes there’s no lack of character shaping and earned emotion that can’t be covered up by overly dour direction and faux dramatic contemplation.  And since the writer and director are the same bloke, there’s only one person to blame.

Now that I’ve dedicated almost 600 words to inarticulate rambling, I’ll finish with this, a quote from the AV Club’s A.A Dowd who summed up my reservations much more succinctly and eloquently…

Apparently the cult of Terrence Malick has grown so devoted that even a blatant imitation of his style can now pass as a religious experience. Flush with whispery voice-over and idyllic shots of the American Southwest, David Lowery’s Ain’t Them Body Saints drowns a thin, generic outlaw saga in poetic affectation.”

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints
Directed By – David Lowery
Wrtten By – David Lowery

***2013 RECAP*** MOVIE REVIEW | Before Midnight

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The 90s gave us a big wave of new, alt film makers who at their core, were massive movie nerds. Nerds like Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh, Kevin Smith, Robert Rodriguez and Richard Linklater. Tarantino has been able to follow his indulgences to some really great places and is possibly more recognisable than any other director working today. The recently retired-from-film-making Soderbergh is one of the most well respected names of the last two decades. Smith rode his train way past the last stop of relevance and film making creativity long ago, easily distracted by whatever bright, shiny trinket he might see out of the corner of his eye. Rodriguez only gets more and more unpredictable (in good and bad ways) as the years go on. And then there’s Richard Linklater, the quiet achiever.

Linklater is the guy who can make crowd pleasing fluff that’s actually really good, like School of Rock. The guy who can actually come really close to translating Philip K Dick to the screen with A Scanner Darkly. The guy who can make genre pulp like The Newton Boys one minute, then turn around and make an art house, philosophical talk fest like Waking Life the next. All that, plus a movie a lot of people see is an outright modern American classic, Dazed and Confused.

He’s also the bloke who’s made a trilogy out of two people doing nothing more than walking and talking. Sequels are usually reserved for action, sci-fi and the odd comedy. With the just released Before Midnight, Linklater has managed to build a franchise on one compelling relationship.

If you haven’t see 1994’s Before Sunrise or 2004’s Before Sunset, look out, there will be some spoilers. There’s no way to talk about Before Midnight without getting into the movies that preceded it.

Ethan Hawke is Jesse, Julie Delpie is Celine. They met nineteen years ago in Before Sunrise, on a train in Austria. They spend the night walking around Vienna, talking about life, the universe and everything, and falling in love. With Hawke’s character flying back to America the next morning, they have to say goodbye. Until nine years later, when a book he writes about that night leads to a publicity stop in Paris where Delpie’s character tracks him down in Before Sunset. They spend the day walking around Paris, talking about life, the universe and everything, and realising they have stayed in love this whole time, without ever seeing each other.

Which brings us to today, Before Midnight finds them in Greece and these two crazy kids have finally got it all figured out. They’ve spent the last nine years together, popped out a set of twins and the honeymoon period has long since passed. While the long, single takes are still there, Midnight deviates the most from its predecessors in its reliance on an extended cast. The first two Befores focused purely on Hawke and Delpie, with other roles barely more than extras with a line or two. The first half of Midnight however, has them surrounded by their children, friends and colleagues. And then… Then the second half kicks you right in the guts.

When the two main characters argue it feels so real I got uncomfortable watching it. They have the kind of arguments where they are both completely right, but going about everything completely wrong. So it’s hard to want either to win. While Sunrise and Sunset are all about the unlimited possibilities of love and romance and how ultimately, nothing can get in the way, Midnight is about what happens when you get what you want and the novelty wears off.

I wouldn’t call it cynical, there are still plenty of those little moments that make you think Jesse and Celine are the world’s most perfect couple, Before Midnight is just a little world weary. LIke the two earlier films, Midnight finishes at the perfect moment and if the series ends here, no one could complain. But I don’t think it will end here and can’t wait to see where these two characters are in another nine or ten years. And I can’t wait to see what else Linklater makes in between now and then as well.

Directed By – Richard Linklater
Written By – Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke

MOVIE REVIEW | Oz the Great and Powerful (2013)

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Sam Raimi began the new millennium in real style.  The Bryan Singer X-Men movies were solid, but Raimi’s 2002 Spiderman is really responsible for the invasion of mega budget superhero franchises we’ve had since then.  He followed it up with a great first sequel and a not so great (but not as bad as people say) second sequel.  A couple of years of letting the disappointment of Spiderman 3 die down and he returned to his roots with a low budget horror movie called Drag Me to Hell that you probably never saw.  Meaning this year’s Oz the Great and Powerful was his return to a huge budget, big name stars and a property we’re all familiar with.  And I think he nailed it.


James Franco is Oscar “Oz” Diggs, a turn of the 20th century travelling magician and grifter.  When he works one con too many, he escapes his vengeful victims in a hot air balloon, flying right into tornado.  Until this point, everything is in square screened black and white.  As Franco takes in his new surroundings, the aspect ratio widens and the spectrum exploding colours fade in to show the land of Oz in all its glory.

Franco quickly meets a witch played by Mila Kunis, a winged monkey voiced by Zach Braff, another witch played Rachel Weisz’s Evenora. an anthropomorphised china doll named appropriately (or is that lazily), China Girl and yet another witch, this one played by Michelle Williams.  There’s a prophecy to live up to, a mountain of gold at stake, a war to be won and innocent lives to save.  And I’ll be buggered if Franco’s Oscar Diggs doesn’t also learn a few valuable lessons along the way.  This thing really does move at breakneck speed and never really stops for a breather.

One thing struck me half way through Oz.  If everything in The Wizard of Oz was just Dorothy’s dream, how and why does the world exist outside of her head?  Do her dreams come with back story to fill in what happened before she got there?  I’ve never read the source books by L. Frank Baum, and let’s be honest, I probably never will.  So maybe he explains this, but to me, that realisation sort of took the wind out of the movie’s sails a little.  But only a little.

Heavy reliance on CGI gets a lot of criticism, and generally it’s deserved, but when used well, like it is in Oz the Great and Powerful, it can be just another tool at a director’s disposal to tell their story in the best, most effective way.  The little China Girl is a great example.  She’s more realistic and more effective as a character than anything crapped out in Avatar.  The CGI is also offset by the old fashioned, mechanical nature of the gadgets the Diggs character and his band of Tinkers build to use in their fight against the evil sister witches.  Even though computers were used to create pretty much everything we see on the screen, the fact that they’re depicting Edison style, early 20th century inventions gives these super modern effects a certain old fashioned charm.

Oz the Great and Powerful will never have the enduring legacy or classic status of 1939’s The Wizard of Oz, but if we had to get a 21st century, CGI heavy version of this world, I’m glad they gave the reigns to Sam Raimi.  And I’m glad he gave the lead role to James Franco who jumps in head first and really delivers on the charisma needed to make Oscar Diggs the conman and reluctant hero this movie needed.        

Directed By – Sam Raimi
Written By – Mitchell Kapner, David Lyndsay-Abaire

MOVIE REVIEW | Heaven’s Gate (1980)

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It’s one thing for a movie to bomb so bad it ruins a director’s career.  It’s another thing for a movie to bomb so bad, it almost ruins the studio that made it.  Heaven’s Gate was director Michael Cimino’s follow up to The Deer Hunter, which had won him a Best Director Oscar.  It’s also seen today as one of the movies that killed the American auteur system of the 70s.  People like Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Dennis Hopper, Peter Bogdonavich and Warren Beatty had all had a great run making personal films that created critical buzz and decent box office returns.  Then Cimino crapped all over it with this shit bomb that went way over schedule and way over budget.


Actually, that’s harsh.  Before watching it, Heaven’s Gate had a mythical status for me as that shit bomb, so I had some pretty strong preconceived notions.  Preconceived notions only made stronger when I saw it came with an almost four hour running time.  Seriously, four hours?  If you can’t tell your story in two and half, three at the absolute most (and your movie had better be a ball tarer if you’re gonna take three hours of my life), maybe you should look at making a TV series, not one of film.

And that’s the thing, while I was watching, I checked the clock a few times, but not constantly, so the running time wasn’t a huge issue.  But when I think back, I can’t recall four hours worth of story.  It opens with main character James Averill, played by Kris Kristofferson, graduating from Harvard in 1870, in a sequence that could have been done in ten minutes, but goes for closer to thirty.  It then jumps twenty years ahead to the midst of land disputes between American land barons and European immigrants.   Kristofferson is on the side of the immigrants because he’s banging an immigrant whore…  Oh, that and because he’s a top bloke with principals and stuff.  About an hour in (just over a quarter, if you’re doing the maths), we meet Nate Champion, played by Christopher Walken, Kristofferson’s rival for the whore’s golden heart.  It’s great to see Walken before he became “Walken”.  No weird line deliveries, no creepiness, no “quirk”.  Just a solid, subtle performance.  That really is the broad strokes of what fills the four hours, it’s not a complicated story, though the characters are.

Watching Heaven’s Gate, it’s easy to see where all the money and time went in its making.  It looks absolutely amazing.  Shot on location in a Montana national park, every exterior shot has the most amazing, natural backdrop of deep valleys, snow capped peaks and wild frontier.  In a modern world of movies full of slapped together CGI, this really is one of the most impressive looking movies I’ve ever seen.  And more than just the natural wonders, Cimino adds an almost gold filter to the majority of the film.  Some scenes are somehow monochrome, but full of deep, rich colour at the same time.

On one hand, I can understand why it wasn’t a huge success on release, but on the other, I think it is a legitimately awesome piece of film making.  And the best part, the title comes from a roller skating rink seen several times throughout the story.  Yep, this epic tragedy is named after rolling skating rink.  I can only hope if a movie is ever made about some terrible time in my hometown’s past, they have the forethought to call it Skate Haven.

Directed By – Michael Cimino
Written By – Michael Cimino

MOVIE REVIEW | Buster Keaton: Sherlock Jr. (1924) / Steamboat Bill Jr. (1928)

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I figure if I was gonna jump in to the world of silent movies, I could do a lot worse than starting with one of the big two names.  In Sherlock Jr. the initial title cards setup Buster Keaton’s character as a cinema employee and student detective.  Initially, this seemed like a pretty ham fisted attempt to link a series of otherwise unrelated sketches.  The first, Keaton struggling for money to buy his sweetheart chocolates before a date.  This simple sequence is nothing more than Keaton sweeping rubbish in front of the cinema, talking to a couple of people while finding and losing money.  Such a simple premise, but full of great jokes.


Later, at the home of his sweetheart, her father’s pocket watch is stolen and Keaton is setup as the crook.  Dejected, he goes back to work at the cinema and falls asleep while running the projector.  This is where Sherlock Jr. really takes off.

A lengthy dream sequence, that takes up around half of the total running time, sees Keaton enter the movie he’s projecting and get caught up in a stolen pearls mystery that parallels his own troubles with the missing pocket watch.  This is a really elaborately scripted, meticulously shot and amazingly edited fantasy sequence that must have been mind blowing at the time.  It really is impressive to see some of the tricks and effects they pull off, all in camera, achieved through nothing more than editing and performance.

Four years later, Keaton made Steamboat Bill Jr. (there are no character or thematic links between the two, only the “Jr.” suffix in their titles).  This is definitely a step up in ambition, performance and film making skill in every way.  While Sherlock clocks in at around 40 minutes, Steamboat breaks the one hour barrier.  And Keaton uses the extra running time awesomely.


This is much more like the kind of straight forward movie plot we see today.  Where Sherlock is an excuse for sketches to be loosely strung together, Steamboat has a real, flowing narrative that works as an excuse for sketches to be tightly strung together while telling a Romeo and Juliet style romance.

Keaton plays William Canfield Junior.  He arrives in the town of River Junction, fresh from college in Boston, to work on his father’s rundown steamboat.  Keaton’s Bill Jr. is hardly the man’s man Bill Sr. was hoping for in a son and this clash of ideologies leads to some of the funniest sequences.  Coincidentally, Bill Jr’s college sweetheart also arrives in River Junction.  Even more coincidentally, she’s the daughter of Bill Sr’s arch rival, the owner of a new luxurious riverboat.

Keaton’s ever escalating desperation to please his father and his girlfriend, while also adapting to life on the river, make for some of the best physical comedy you’ll ever see.  Like with Sherlock Jr, I spent most of the movie wondering how those things were physically possible.  But they have to be, because with no high tech special effects or CGI to rely on in the 20s, the only way they could be done was physically.

When I decided to watch Sherlock Jr. and Steamboat Jr, it almost felt like homework.  Like I had to get these two under my belt to help my movie nerd cred.  But once I actually watched them, I realised why they’re still talked about today, not because they’re “important”, historical documents, but because Buster Keaton was amazing and because these are great, funny, well made movies.

Sherlock Jr. – Watch the full movie streaming for free HERE 
Directed By – Buster Keaton
Written By – Clyde Bruckman, Jean Havez, Joseph A Mitchell

Steamboat Bill Jr. – Watch the full movie streaming for free HERE 
Directed By – Charles Reisner, Buster Keaton
Written By – Carl Harbaugh, Buster Keaton
 

MOVIE REVIEW | Before Midnight (2013)

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The 90s gave us a big wave of new, alt film makers who at their core, were massive movie nerds.  Nerds like Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh, Kevin Smith, Robert Rodriguez and Richard Linklater.   Tarantino has been able to follow his indulgences to some really great places and is possibly more recognisable than any other director working today.   The recently retired-from-film-making Soderbergh is one of the most well respected names of the last two decades.  Smith rode his train way past the last stop of relevance and film making creativity long ago, easily distracted by whatever bright, shiny trinket he might see out of the corner of his eye.  Rodriguez only gets more and more unpredictable (in good and bad ways) as the years go on.  And then there’s Richard Linklater, the quiet achiever.

Linklater is the guy who can make crowd pleasing fluff that’s actually really good, like School of Rock.  The guy who can actually come really close to translating Philip K Dick to the screen with A Scanner Darkly.  The guy who can make genre pulp like The Newton Boys one minute, then turn around and make an art house, philosophical talk fest like Waking Life the next.  All that, plus a movie a lot of people see is an outright modern American classic, Dazed and Confused.

He’s also the bloke who’s made a trilogy out of two people doing nothing more than walking and talking.   Sequels are usually reserved for action, sci-fi and the odd comedy.  With the just released Before Midnight, Linklater has managed to build a franchise on one compelling relationship.

If you haven’t see 1994’s Before Sunrise or 2004’s Before Sunset, look out, there will be some spoilers.  There’s no way to talk about Before Midnight without getting into the movies that preceded it.

Ethan Hawke is Jesse, Julie Delpie is Celine.  They met nineteen years ago in Before Sunrise, on a train in Austria.  They spend the night walking around Vienna, talking about life, the universe and everything, and falling in love.  With Hawke’s character flying back to America the next morning, they have to say goodbye.  Until nine years later, when a book he writes about that night leads to a publicity stop in Paris where Delpie’s character tracks him down in Before Sunset.  They spend the day walking around Paris, talking about life, the universe and everything, and realising they have stayed in love this whole time, without  ever seeing each other.

Which brings us to today, Before Midnight finds them in Greece and these two crazy kids have finally got it all figured out.  They’ve spent the last nine years together, popped out a set of twins and the honeymoon period has long since passed.  While the long, single takes are still there, Midnight deviates the most from its predecessors in its reliance on an extended cast.  The first two Befores focused purely on Hawke and Delpie, with other roles barely more than extras with a line or two.  The first half of Midnight however, has them surrounded by their children, friends and colleagues.  And then…  Then the second half kicks you right in the guts.

When the two main characters argue it feels so real I got uncomfortable watching it.  They have the kind of arguments where they are both completely right, but going about everything completely wrong.  So it’s hard to want either to win.  While Sunrise and Sunset are all about the unlimited possibilities of love and romance and how ultimately, nothing can get in the way, Midnight is about what happens when you get what you want and the novelty wears off.

I wouldn’t call it cynical, there are still plenty of those little moments that make you think Jesse and Celine are the world’s most perfect couple, Before Midnight is just a little world weary.  LIke the two earlier films, Midnight finishes at the perfect moment and if the series ends here, no one could complain.  But I don’t think it will end here and can’t wait to see where these two characters are in another nine or ten years. And I can’t wait to see what else Linklater makes in between now and then as well.

Directed By – Richard Linklater
Written By – Richard LinklaterJulie DelpyEthan Hawke