Tag: Jon Favreau

MOVIE REVIEW | ***CLOSING DOWN WEEK*** Made (2001)

In a nutshell, Bored & Dangerous says: “For a movie about small time hoods, playing for small time stakes, Made is a surprisingly great showcase of Favreau’s talents as a director.”

Made 1
Recently, in my neighbourhood, I saw something that’s all too common these days. A video shop that was closing down. They had a big sign out the front, “4 movies for $10”. I looked in my wallet, saw $30 and decided I wasn’t leaving that shop until I found 12 movies I thought were worth having on my DVD shelf. Some were movies I’d seen before. Some were movies I had a vague idea about and thought would be worth the $2.50 gamble. Some were oddities I’d never even heard of, but they looked interesting enough. So, thank you, Network Video Brunswick West. I never rented anything from you or even had a membership, but I did find some cool, interesting and mysterious things on your almost empty shelves.

“At our hotel room we’re gonna have kind of a pool party. California gangster-style, you know what I mean? Kick ass pool party thing.”

In the 90s, two unknown and undiscovered actors named Vince Vaughn and Jon Favreau got sick of being unknown and undiscovered, so they went ahead and wrote one of the decade’s defining movies, Swingers. These days, Vaughn bounces from one high profile, shitty looking comedy to another, while Jon Favreau set the tone for what comic movies are today by making the first two Iron Man movies. But in between Swingers and Iron Man, Favreau had to make his bones, prove that Swingers wasn’t a fluke. His first step towards that, was Made.


Amateur boxers by night, construction laborers by day, Bobby (Favreau) and Ricky (Vaughn) are your standard movie pair of male friends. Bobby is conscientious, hard working and reserved, while Ricky is a loud mouthed loser, always looking for the easy way to do whatever job is at hand. When Bobby’s temper gets the better of him and he beats up a customer where his girlfriend works as a stripper, he’s called in to see his boss, and local Los Angeles crime boss, Max (Peter Falk). This is Bobby’s last chance with Max, and he’s given a mysterious job to perform in New York. (more…)

MOVIE REVIEW | ***FLOP WEEK 2*** Cowboys and Aliens (2011)

In a nutshell, Bored & Dangerous says: “It’s all goofy, not very good CGI aliens, little winks to the camera about the wackiness of high-tech meeting the old west, and one awkward battle scene after another. ”

Aliens 1
“Don’t yank on it, it’s not your pecker.”

In 2011, Jon Favreau had played a major part in establishing what is now the behemoth Marvel Cinematic Universe, by directing two mega successful Iron Man movies. In 2011, Daniel Craig had helped reinvigorate the James Bond series and after only two movies, was already considered one of the best to ever play the titular spy. In 2011, Harrison Ford decided to soil the pants of Star Wars nerds everywhere by taking a role in another alien centric, sci-fi movie. In 2011, Olivia Wilde was one of Hollywood’s next ‘it’ female stars. In 2011, Paul Dano, Sam Rockwell and Keith Carradine all held status as some of the leading character actors of their respective generations. In 2011, the nerds had won and comic book movies were officially ruling the big screen, with fatigue yet to set in. Yet, with all of that going for it, Cowboys and Aliens kind of shit the bed.


It’s the old west, and Jake Lonegran (Craig) wakes up with no idea where he is or how he got there. What he does know is, there’s a strange metal brace clasped to one of his wrists. When some no good cowpokes stumble across Jake, they think the brace is a handcuff, which means they think Jake is an escaped prisoner, which means they think there might be a bounty on his head. When they try to take him down, Jake reveals himself to be one of those movie bad asses who can perfectly land any bullet or punch without even looking at the target or breaking a sweat. Winning the day, he takes their clothes, a horse and one of their dogs, and heads to the nearest town. (more…)

***2013 RECAP*** MOVIE REVIEW | Iron Man 3

iron-man-3-official-hd

A soldier going through serious P.T.S.D…  Now that’s an interesting jumping off point for a super hero blockbuster that will probably make more money from kids buying action figures than it will from tickets sold at the box office.  It’s also something that makes Iron Man 3 stand out a little from the overly saturated super hero crowd.   Director and co-writer Shane Black had a tough job on his hands…  Take over an established, crazy successful franchise and try to keep his one, single character entertaining and interesting after we’ve all seen the awesome team up fun of The Avengers.


The movie opens in the early 90s with Robert Downey Jr as Tony Stark and Jon Favreau as his bodyguard Happy.  This is Tony Stark back in his cool days, pounding booze and bangin’ broads, like any rich playboy should.   He also rudely dismisses a scientist played by Guy Pearce.  But that’s OK, I’m sure his revolutionary theories will amount to nothing and his anger and jealousy towards Stark won’t manifest as a crazy revenge plot.  Oh snap, I was wrong.  That’s exactly what happens.

Cut to the present day and Tony Stark is obsessively tinkering in his work shop building new and improved Iron Man suits.  We learn pretty quickly this is all a coping mechanism as he tries to distract himself from the horrible things he saw in New York in the Avengers climax, and the dark thoughts about what might be next.  He’s eventually snapped out of his funk by the prospect of throwing down with new global terrorist on the block, the Mandarin, played by an awesome Ben Kinglsey who chews the scenery gloriously every second he’s on screen.  Don Cheadle is in his own Iron Man suit, rebranded as the Iron Patriot after a red, white and blue paint job and shows up just enough to add to the movie in fun ways without ever overstaying his welcome.

Through a series of events, Tony Stark spends a lot of this movie out of the Iron Man suit.  That’s not a bad thing.  If he’s not in the suit, it means we’re not constantly being hammered with crazy fight scenes and mass destruction.  By resisting wall to wall action, it makes the few set pieces hit that much harder when they do occur,  like the squadron of Iron Men that appear in the movie’s big climax.  Even though I’d seen it in the trailers, the site of a couple of dozen Iron Men all flying to Tony Stark’s side for the last big battle still gave me a bit of a charge.

Shane Black’s screenplay brings plenty of great Shane Blackness to this world and helps give this character a new and interesting perspective.  He knows how to write dry sarcasm better than anyone and Downey knows exactly how it should be delivered.  I wouldn’t say this is the best Iron Man movie, but it’s more fresh and entertaining than anything you’d expect this deep into a franchise.  And it’s definitely better than Iron Man 2.

Iron Man 3
Directed By – Shane Black
Written By – Shane Black, Drew Pearce

 

 

MOVIE REVIEW | Iron Man 3 (2013)

iron-man-3-official-hd

A soldier going through serious P.T.S.D…  Now that’s an interesting jumping off point for a super hero blockbuster that will probably make more money from kids buying action figures than it will from tickets sold at the box office.  It’s also something that makes Iron Man 3 stand out a little from the overly saturated super hero crowd.   Director and co-writer Shane Black had a tough job on his hands…  Take over an established, crazy successful franchise and try to keep his one, single character entertaining and interesting after we’ve all seen the awesome team up fun of The Avengers.

The movie opens in the early 90s with Robert Downey Jr as Tony Stark and Jon Favreau as his bodyguard Happy.  This is Tony Stark back in his cool days, pounding booze and bangin’ broads, like any rich playboy should.   He also rudely dismisses a scientist played by Guy Pearce.  But that’s OK, I’m sure his revolutionary theories will amount to nothing and his anger and jealousy towards Stark won’t manifest as a crazy revenge plot.  Oh snap, I was wrong.  That’s exactly what happens.

Cut to the present day and Tony Stark is obsessively tinkering in his work shop building new and improved Iron Man suits.  We learn pretty quickly this is all a coping mechanism as he tries to distract himself from the horrible things he saw in New York in the Avengers climax, and the dark thoughts about what might be next.  He’s eventually snapped out of his funk by the prospect of throwing down with new global terrorist on the block, the Mandarin, played by an awesome Ben Kinglsey who chews the scenery gloriously every second he’s on screen.  Don Cheadle is in his own Iron Man suit, rebranded as the Iron Patriot after a red, white and blue paint job and shows up just enough to add to the movie in fun ways without ever overstaying his welcome.

Through a series of events, Tony Stark spends a lot of this movie out of the Iron Man suit.  That’s not a bad thing.  If he’s not in the suit, it means we’re not constantly being hammered with crazy fight scenes and mass destruction.  By resisting wall to wall action, it makes the few set pieces hit that much harder when they do occur,  like the squadron of Iron Men that appear in the movie’s big climax.  Even though I’d seen it in the trailers, the site of a couple of dozen Iron Men all flying to Tony Stark’s side for the last big battle still gave me a bit of a charge.

Shane Black’s screenplay brings plenty of great Shane Blackness to this world and helps give this character a new and interesting perspective.  He knows how to write dry sarcasm better than anyone and Downey knows exactly how it should be delivered.  I wouldn’t say this is the best Iron Man movie, but it’s more fresh and entertaining than anything you’d expect this deep into a franchise.  And it’s definitely better than Iron Man 2.

Iron Man 3
Directed By – Shane Black
Written By – Shane Black, Drew Pearce