MUSIC REVIEW | The Flying Burrito Brothers – The Gilded Palace of Sin and Burritos (1970)

In a nutshell, Bored & Dangerous says: “Almost hypnotising in how easy it is to get lost in.”

Burrito 1
Is The Flying Burrito Brothers the worst band name ever?  Possibly, it’s supremely corny, dodgy and sounds like something that would be the result of really unfunny people thinking they’re being hilarious.  But The Flying Burrito Brothers are one of those revered bands with a reputation that only grows with each passing year.  So despite their shit house name, I knew I had to listen to them and their also terribly named album, The Gilded Palace of Sin and Burritos.

Straight away, Christine’s Tune (Devil in Disguise) lets me know that I’m dealing with quality country music.  There’s plenty of twang, but a real rock, counter culture vibe to it as well.  It’s balls out of the bath, full blown traditional country though when the pedal steel is pulled out for Sin City.  With dual vocals all the way through, there’s a real heartbreak at the core of this song that is probably what a lot of people think of, for better or worse, when they think of vintage country music.

While the country vibe is still undeniable, Dark end of the Street almost has a 60s soul and RnB vibe to it.  But it’s back to a real boot scootin’ approach on My Uncle.  This is old school country at its most quaint and effective.  Things get less traditional, more adventurous and complex on Hot Burrito #1.  It’s sprawling, loose and kind of beautiful.

With its Hammond organ and spoken word delivery, The Gilded Palace of Sin and Burritos closes things out with an almost evangelical sermon that is Hippie Boy.  It’s like nothing else on the record, yet somehow, a perfect and fitting ending.
Burrito 2
When I listened to Gram Parson’s solo effort GP, I said, “the album as a whole is just so easy to listen to, to let happen. GP is the kind of album you could listen to intensely and find all sorts of emotion and heartbreak in the lyrics, or you could have on in the background while you go about some other business.”  Here, as a part of a larger collective, Parsons and the rest of the Flying Burrito Brothers have the same effect.  The Gilded Palace of Sin and Burritos is almost hypnotising in how easy it is to get lost in.

The Flying Burrito Brothers

Other opinions Are Available.  What did these people have to say about The Gilded Palace of Sin and Burritos?
Rolling Stone
Pop Matters
My Kind of Country

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